Body Awareness of the Core 

Each person can attain their individual goals for health and fitness and live a pain-free life without having to hold back. By assessing posture, discussing past and current conditions due to injuries, chronic problems, or work-related stress, will give enough information to design a Core training program that is best suited for each individual.

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Body Awareness of the Core

Strength begins at the CORE!

Each person can attain their individual goals for health and fitness and live a pain-free life without having to hold back. By assessing posture, discussing past and current conditions due to injuries, chronic problems, or work-related stress, will give enough information to design a Core training program that is best suited for each individual.

The “core” is a term used to describe just about everything on your body that isn’t your legs and arms. This means you can think of your glutes, hips, abdominal muscles, inner abdominal muscles, pelvic floor, and scapula as your core. Your core is where your power is generated in order to carry out any movement.

Whether you are:

  • a beginner at exercising
  • recovering from giving birth
  • afraid of getting injured
  • empty nester
  • recovering from an injury
  • want an ongoing exercise program
  • wanting to age in good health and fitness

Core training can offer you:

  • ease of movement
  • freedom from the pain of injury
  • better posture (i.e., better movement/well being, free of pain)
  • a way to build muscle more efficiently
  • lose unwanted fat and tone your body

 

Additional Information on Core Strength with Bodies on the Move:

Can a weak core cause lower back pain?
If the muscles surrounding your spine are weak, the vertebrae and discs of your spine won’t be properly supported. The lower back is supposed to have a forward curve to it, but weak core muscles will make this position impossible, resulting in pain in the surrounding muscles and tendons.

Why is core strength necessary?
Core conditioning is a lot more than just doing crunches to expose that six pack. Crunches only train one muscle of the core: the rectus abdominis. The core is composed of multiple muscle groups including the abdominal and low back muscles, diaphragm, pelvic floor muscles, latissimus dorsi, hip flexors and the gluteal muscles. All these muscles work in concert to stabilize the spine while moving your limbs.

The core is the link between the lower and upper body. The core transfers forces and power between the lower body and the upper body. For optimal performance the core needs to be solid, to avoid energy leaks within the kinetic chain. A dysfunctional core that ineffectively transfers forces will put more strain on the limb muscles and tendons, resulting in overuse injuries.

Why else is core strength helpful?
Another function of the core is to stabilize the body’s center during movements that require a high degree of balance or body control.

A solid core keeps your back healthy, helps you to maintain good posture, improves your balance, enhances performance and prevents injuries. A strong core will help you throw a ball further and can even help you to change direction faster.

To build a strong functional core, you need to train more diversely than just doing crunches. Crunches only work the core in one plane of motion (transverse plane of motion). Focus on flexion, rotation, lateral flexion and the posterior core to address all three planes of motion.

 

Benefits of having a strong core include…

  1. Help prevent injuries
  2. Protect your internal organs and central nervous system
  3. Help ease or eliminate back pain
  4. Better posture
  5. You will feel (and look) better

Just because you’re strong, it doesn’t mean you have a strong core. It really is something everyone can work on!

Contact Janet to schedule an appointment for
Body Awareness and Core Body Training

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